AGGRENOX is a prescription medication used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

Insight for Caregivers

Help make a difference in the life of someone who has experienced a stroke or TIA

Caring for a friend or family member after a TIA (transient ischemic attack or "mini-stroke") or stroke can be a challenge. In addition to the day-to-day care and attention your loved one needs, you may also worry about the possibility of a future stroke. Consider talking with your loved one's doctor about whether FDA-approved AGGRENOX is right for them.

After a TIA or stroke caused by a blood clot, the risk of another stroke is increased. AGGRENOX can help reduce the risk.

In fact, in a clinical trial:

  • Over 90% of patients on AGGRENOX remained stroke-free for 2 years (1493 patients out of a total of 1650).
  • Patients taking AGGRENOX twice daily were 22% less likely to have a stroke than patients taking low-dose aspirin (25 mg twice daily) alone.
  • AGGRENOX was twice as effective as low-dose aspirin (25 mg twice daily) at reducing the risk of a subsequent stroke when tested against a sugar pill.

Be prepared

If you're caring for someone who has had a stroke due to a blood clot, you can help prepare yourself by:

  • Learning about the condition—Find out all you can about your loved one's condition, as well as ways to help reduce his or her risk of a stroke. Get links to helpful resources for patients and caregivers
  • Assessing the situation—Write down everything, including the person's needs and abilities, your own abilities and limitations, and your financial, healthcare, and support resources. This can help you develop a plan for caregiving.
  • Partnering with the doctor—Write down any questions ahead of time, and consider scheduling a consultation appointment for more uninterrupted time. Create a personalized doctor discussion guide now
  • Gathering your support network—Sit down with everyone who may be involved in giving care to your loved one. Talk about what's happening and split up responsibilities.

Know the effects of stroke

A stroke can cause a range of damage—depending on the part of the brain affected. Your loved one may experience some of the following common effects of stroke:

  • Weakness or paralysis of one side of the body
  • Vision problems
  • Emotional problems
  • Cognitive difficulties (trouble with thinking, understanding, learning, or remembering)
  • Difficulty with speech

To help your loved one manage both the physical and emotional challenges of life after a stroke, you may have many different responsibilities.

These may include:

  • Helping your loved one to stay on track with his or her treatment plan—and ensure that all medications are being taken as prescribed
  • Caring for your loved one's personal hygiene
  • Cleaning and other housekeeping duties
  • Shopping and preparing meals
  • Arranging for transportation to doctor appointments, rehabilitation, and other outings
  • Helping your loved one work on any skills he or she may have learned in rehabilitation
  • Managing his or her finances as well as legal and business affairs, if needed
  • Providing companionship or, if needed, supervision
  • Planning recreational activities

Help your loved one follow his or her treatment plan each day

You can help lower your loved one's risk of another stroke by understanding his or her condition.

Here is some information you should know about your loved one's overall health:

Blood pressure number: Make sure your loved one has his or her blood pressure checked.

Cholesterol numbers—Total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol: Make sure your loved one has his or her cholesterol tested if your loved one has high cholesterol or other risk factors.

Medical history: Ask the doctor if there are any other medical conditions you should be aware of, including diabetes or heart problems.

Diet and exercise habits: Work together with your loved one and his or her doctor to make any changes needed to reduce stroke risk through diet and exercise.

How to deal with the stress of being a caregiver

Being a caregiver is hard work. Enlist outside help whenever possible. This may include home health aides for personal care assistance, homemaker assistants for help with household tasks, or meal programs to ease the burden of grocery shopping and cooking. Other family members or friends may be able to help out too.

  • Take time for yourself—Find a part-time caregiver or adult day care to help out when you need a break.
  • Monitor yourself for signs of depression—It can be frustrating and sad at times to care for someone who has suffered a stroke.
  • Keep up with your own interests—Continue your hobbies as much as possible.
  • Remain social—Try to continue to see friends when possible.
  • Take care of your own health—Eat a well-balanced diet and get at least 30 minutes of physical activity a few days a week.
  • Find a support group—It helps to know that you are not alone. Find others to share your experiences with. Find organizations that can connect you with support groups

Next:  Helpful Resources

Learn about AGGRENOX

Find out how many patients in a clinical study remained stroke-free over 2 years.

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Stroke and TIA Stories

Find out how others are reducing
their risk of a
subsequent
stroke.

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Save on AGGRENOX

You may be eligible for $0 co-pays with the AGGRENOX Co-Pay Card.

Sign up for your co-pay card now

The Taking Smart Steps™ program

Get free tips, tools, and information to help you stay on track with your treatment.

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Be prepared
for your next
doctor's visit

Create a personalized doctor discussion guide to capture your questions
and concerns.

Create your guide now

Insights for caregivers

Caring for someone after a stroke can be difficult.

Get info and advice that may help

Savings and support

Find out about savings on AGGRENOX and FREE support programs.

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Insight for caregivers

Get information tailored to those who are caring for someone who has experienced a stroke or TIA.

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Helpful resources

Learn more about stroke and what you can do to reduce your risk with these resources.

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Aggrenox® (aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole) 25 mg/200 mg capsules is a prescription medicine used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients who are allergic to any ingredient in AGGRENOX, or allergic to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or who have the combination of asthma, runny nose, and nasal polyps. AGGRENOX should not be given to a child or teenager.

AGGRENOX increases the risk of bleeding, including bleeding into the brain, stomach or intestines. Any bleeding you have may take longer to stop when you are taking AGGRENOX.

AGGRENOX should be avoided by patients with a history of stomach ulcers or those who drink three or more alcoholic drinks a day, as these can increase the risk of bleeding. Patients should tell their doctor about all medicines they are taking, especially blood thinners, heparin, warfarin, NSAIDs, heart medicines, or medicines for high blood pressure, including diuretics ("water pills").

AGGRENOX should be avoided during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients with severe liver or kidney problems. The most common side effects of AGGRENOX are headache, upset stomach, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Click here for full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

EXPAND SAFETY INFORMATION

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Aggrenox® (aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole) 25 mg/200 mg capsules is a prescription medicine used to lower the risk of stroke in people who have had a "mini-stroke" (transient ischemic attack or TIA) or stroke due to a blood clot.

AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients who are allergic to any ingredient in AGGRENOX, or allergic to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), or who have the combination of asthma, runny nose, and nasal polyps. AGGRENOX should not be given to a child or teenager.

AGGRENOX increases the risk of bleeding, including bleeding into the brain, stomach or intestines. Any bleeding you have may take longer to stop when you are taking AGGRENOX.

AGGRENOX should be avoided by patients with a history of stomach ulcers or those who drink three or more alcoholic drinks a day, as these can increase the risk of bleeding. Patients should tell their doctor about all medicines they are taking, especially blood thinners, heparin, warfarin, NSAIDs, heart medicines, or medicines for high blood pressure, including diuretics ("water pills").

AGGRENOX should be avoided during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. AGGRENOX should be avoided in patients with severe liver or kidney problems. The most common side effects of AGGRENOX are headache, upset stomach, and diarrhea.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Click here for full Prescribing Information including Patient Information.